JoJo 6251

From JoJo's Bizarre Encyclopedia - JoJo Wiki
(Redirected from 6251)
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Brilliant! Elaborate! Bold! Hirohiko Araki's Illustrative World and popular manga series, JoJo's Bizarre Adventure; the essence of 6251 pages combined into one book!
—JoJo6251 Obi

JoJo 6251: The World of Hirohiko Araki (JOJO 6251 荒木飛呂彦の世界, JoJo 6251 Araki Hirohiko no Sekai), first tentatively named JOJO JOBS,[3] is an artbook written and illustrated by Hirohiko Araki and Lucky Land Communications. It includes pictures and information from JoJo's Bizarre Adventure, ranging from Phantom Blood to Diamond is Unbreakable.

The artbook's name is in reference to the approximate amount of pages JoJo's Bizarre Adventure had at the time of the artbook's announcement.

Summary

Araki working on the cover

The first part of the artbook contains mostly artist renditions of characters from the series and Araki's previous works. The book is 11.7 x 8.3 x 0.8 inches and features 98 pages in full, vibrant color.

The second half of the book is comprised of character profiles, the history of JoJo's Bizarre Adventure, a glossary of terms and concepts used in the series, an interview with Hirohiko Araki, a timeline, and a foldout poster.

The artwork of Josuke on the cover took Araki 6 hours to complete, half of it spent on coloring alone.[4]

The English version of the artbook was announced by VIZ Media on July 9, 2021, and was planned to be published in Spring 2022.[5] However, it was then delayed to January 24, 2023,[6] then April 11, 2023,[7] and then delayed to May 23, 2023.[8] The English version fixed a few mistakes from the original version, but not all of them. It also added a few names for characters who were named after the original art book released, such as Anne and Forever. However, Malèna, Caravan Serai, and Shizuka Joestar's names were not added, instead being kept as "Nice Lady", "Swordsmith", and "Invisible Baby", respectively.

Interview

Jojo6251.jpg
Artbook
Interview
Published December 10, 1993

INTERVIEW WITH
HIROHIKO
ARAKI

Hirohiko Araki has created many distinctive works, JoJo included.
Here he discusses little-known details, including his childhood years, the story of his debut, JoJo's secrets, and more, leading us closer to knowing the real Hirohiko Araki.
What led to Araki creating JoJo?
What was his inspiration for Stands?
What is the theme of Part 4?
These and other mysteries will be revealed in this, Araki's first long-form interview.



Stands—apparitions of life energy—What was their inspiration?

From the very beginning, I had decided that JoJo's protagonist would change with every new part. I'd planned on having three parts, or thereabout, each time refreshing the characters, battles, and fighting techniques. And I knew that every protagonist would be called JoJo. At the outset, I hadn't yet come up with the ideas of Ripple or Stands or anything like that. But I knew I wanted JoJo to be a bizarre tale, following a single bloodline, that would start in the past and work its way into the present.
When we came to the end of Part 1, at first my editor opposed me switching away a popular protagonist. But in the end, he agreed with me and said, "The title is 'Bizarre Adventure'—making the manga ought to be an adventure for the creator too." And it really was.

The inspiration for Stands and Ripple come from my skepticism toward supernatural powers. Whenever someone claims to move objects with their mind—first of all, I'm not sure that's even possible—I feel like there's something underhanded going on. It's the same with UFOs or ghosts. People can claim they saw something, but I want evidence, even if it's made up. I need something more persuasive, some kind of explanation to make it fit. Instead of someone looking like they're thinking hard and then an object suddenly breaks, maybe something invisible to other people could actually come out of them and break the object for them. So, Stands are a way for me to explain superpowers, even if it's only quasi-persuasive.[laughs]
The name "Stand" came about because they stand right next to you, like a ghost standing at your bedside. Stands are highly situational, and many different kinds show up in the story. When I came up with the idea, I thought, "What a useful idea. I can use these for anything!" I was pretty proud of that one.[laughs]
That said, I have thought through some defined parameters for Stands. For example, if a Stand has one ability, that Stand won't get a completely different ability added in. A single Stand has a single restricted kind of superpower. As a result, Stands can be categorized into different types.
In Part 3, I linked Stands with tarot cards because I wanted to make the Stands distinctive. At the time, I figured I could probably come up with enough Stands to fill twenty-two cards, but in the end, I needed even more [laughs]. I came into the start of Part 3 with ideas— rough ideas, at least—for fifteen Stands, and at this moment I have about eighty just in my stockpile.
When it comes to designing the Stands, I want them to feel different from robots or armor or things like that. I get ideas from books on yokai and creepy folk art. I first decide on the Stand's abilities, and then I make the design something that doesn't stray too terribly far away from that. But personally, I put more of my heart into the characters' tactics and their psychological battles, rather than the design and form of their Stands. I want to say, look how scary it can be to have an enemy that focuses the attack on only one certain point—for example, instead of yet another powerful enemy, a physically weak one who tells lies.
I set Part 4 in the future—1999—because for one thing, it comes after Part 3, but also because the end of the millennium brings a certain amount of apprehension and unease, while also remaining near enough to present day that I can still depict ordinary life. Going really far into the future would separate the story from a sense of realism. Also, with Part 3, which was set in present day but ran for three years, people were left unsure about when the story was taking place. I also wanted a setting where anything was possible, and where I could make up fake crimes and events. At first, I wanted to set the story in the afterlife, but I decided that would be too unfamiliar.
One of the concepts behind Part 4 is "draw a town, create a town." When I was working on Part 3, I had some ideas that fit into more of an everyday setting—what if the old woman running the tobacco shop was also a Stand user, that kind of thing. In contrast with Part 3, where the enemies were constantly coming and attacking, this time, the enemies could also be in waiting. And because Morioh is still unfinished, I can add a hospital, or maybe the mayor will show up. Maybe something will come up involving issues with the town's garbage management. Whatever it may be, there's still things to come.

I take names for characters in JoJo from foreign musicians because it makes naming characters—and remembering their names—easy. And that's the only reason. [laughs] If I try to make an original name, I second-guess myself and end up with no ideas. Even Kakyoin is named after a town in Sendai. Ever since Part 4 started, I've been coming up with Japanese names, and it's been pretty hard. For Josuke, I'd decided upon two kanji that can also be read as "JoJo," but I didn't know what to do for his family name. In Part 3, I knew what two kanji I wanted for the back-to-back "JoJo" in Jotaro Kujo's name [in Japanese order, his name is Kujo Jotaro], but when it came to deciding what would go around them, I just looked through a kanji dictionary and thought, "Oh, ku [空, sky], huh? That one's nice." For Nijimura, the dictionary came back out again. "I like niji [虹, rainbow]. Nijiki, Nijioka...no, Nijimura." I put together kanji that strike my fancy, while being mindful of how easy the name is to say.
But I'm out of ideas for any other JoJo names. If I end up doing Part 5, I'll probably have a lot of trouble coming up with the protagonist's name. [laughs]

My childhood was manga and movies from morning to night

I think I first started drawing by reproducing Sanpei Shirato's Watari and Tetsuya Chiba's Harris no Kaze. I must've been in kindergarten or first grade. That was a really long time ago. I'm talking about when Ultraman was on TV. Besides drawing copies of manga art, I think I was making stories too, like where the yojimbo fights evildoers. I liked samurai-era manga. I also liked Tiger Mask, Judo Icchokusen, Koya no Shonen Isamu, Kazuo Umezz's horror manga... I liked a lot of manga. I even read the first issue of Shonen Jump.
Among all the manga artists I read, Mitsuteru Yokoyama was particularly influential—Tetsujin 28, Babel II—I loved his manga. The manga writer Ikki Kajiwara was another major influence. I bought a novel of his and read it every night until it practically fell apart.
My childhood was normal, except I was the kind of kid who, when everyone else was excited about something, I'd be watching, just a little bit aloof. You know the kind. And so my interests were manga and movies. I had absolutely no interest in model building or radio-controlled toys. My favorite movie genre was the spaghetti western. Clint Eastwood's were great.
My dad liked him too—Eastwood.
I wrote in one of my author's notes that my parents don't understand my manga. And as far as I can tell, they still don't. But I aspire to be like Eastwood through my manga, so they really should be able to get it, because the spirit is the same. I think if they ever watched JoJo's anime adaptation, they'd probably enjoy it.
I also watched Godzilla movies, and I also enjoyed disaster movies like The Poseidon Adventure. Movie tickets were expensive on my allowance, so I didn't go out to them all that often.

As for athletics, I did kendo. I couldn't do team sports. I tried youth baseball, but when you make an error or something, everyone looks at you. I didn't care for that. It's like, running by myself is fine, but a relay race isn't. If I lose in kendo, the responsibility is only to myself, so that's okay. I wasn't good at working in groups. [laughs]
I also liked magic tricks and slight of hand. I'd buy books and practice techniques. I liked card games too.
And then, it should come as no surprise that I loved foreign rock music. I started listening to bands from the late sixties and after, like Chicago, Yes, Led Zeppelin...I also liked Jackson Browne and Bob Dylan too. In the eighties, I listened to Prince, and I still do—including when I drew the cover of this book. I'm still crazy about him. Progressive rock has kind of an antiquities/Middle-Ages vibe that stirs up my creativity whenever I listen to it.
But when I was a kid, records were too expensive for me to buy, so I would tape songs off the radio. I didn't have a cassette recorder either. Instead, I had a huge reel-to-reel tape recorder I told my parents I needed for English practice, and I'd hold the microphone up to the radio. When I was recording music, I had to stay completely quiet. That's the kind of era it was.[laughs]
I almost never listened to music from Japan.

In high school, there were some days where even though I had school, I really wanted to go to the movie theater, or it would be the release date of the latest Jump magazine, and I couldn't contain myself. So over lunch break I'd leave and go to the bookstore or wherever [laughs].

I've always wanted to make manga, ever since I was a young child. But I kept my dream hidden. When an adult asks, "What do you want to be when you grow up?" and you answer, "A manga artist," they always say, "Good for you," but even as a kid I picked up on the unsaid message: "That'll never happen." And so I never even told my parents that I wanted to be a manga artist. I never made any doujinshi, either.
Eventually, rather than just wanting to be a manga artist, I started feeling like, "I want to draw manga. I want to immerse myself in the pictures, the designs, and the world of a story." Then, as I was attending a design school, I made I think four books, including two Westerns and one science-fiction manga.
I submitted them for Shonen Jump's Tezuka Award. I also liked Shonen Magazine, but in the '80s, they went in the direction of romantic comedies, which I really hated, and that's why I went with Jump.
But then I never heard a word back from the editorial department. Out of a desire to figure out what had happened, I decided to go to Tokyo.
So I went into the Shueisha building with my manga in hand and met with an editor. But when he slid my manuscript out from its envelope, he glanced at the cover page and immediately said, "You forgot to white out this part. Even a grade schooler would have erased that."
He hadn't even looked past the cover yet. I was taken aback. [laughs] But from that experience, I realized that I had to put forth my absolute best effort. And so I rolled up my sleeves, reworked the story, and redrew the art from scratch. I think I took four months to finish about thirty pages. Every day, I came home from school and went to work on my manga. I brought it back to Shueisha, after a few tweaks, it received the runner-up Tezuka Award. This was Poker Under Arms.

From debut to the present

I was fortunate to have Poker Under Arms published in the Jump magazine. I graduated design school and stayed in my family home in Sendai and made manga. My works from that time include a Western called Outlaw Man and the sci-fi Say Hi to Virginia.
Then came my first serialized manga, Cool Shock B.T.. At that time, I was still living with my parents in Sendai. Express deliveries had just become available, and I could send photocopies of my rough outline and hold meetings with my editor over the phone. I was living the Rohan Kishibe life. [laughs]
But my editor at the time was a real tyrant. [laughs] I'd send my finished pages and he'd call me, saying, "I have corrections. Come to Tokyo tomorrow." So then I'd be sitting in some conference room at Shueisha making corrections through the night and thinking, "It would've been better for me just to bring this here in the first place." I was using ashtrays to rinse my brushes or hold my correction fluid. [laughs] And I'd sleep on the train ride home the next day.
That period of rigorous training was also my first time out in the world, and I truly believe I learned a great many things from my editor. I think he influenced me more as a manga artist than any other person. Editors are like tyrants, but they are also like gods. I mean, he was the one who decided that Dio would be in Egypt.
Next was Baoh: The Visitor. I came up with the concept when I was doing B.T., and when I told my editor the idea, he said, "We'll do a serial. Come to Tokyo." And so in summer 1984, I moved to Tokyo. "The Visitor" doesn't really have any special meaning—maybe just in the sense that he comes back and strikes. At the time, biotechnology was a popular topic I thought I could use in a manga. So the name "Baoh" comes from "bio." And stories about big muscle guys like Rambo were very popular, so I thought I needed to pursue a more muscular style.
I'm often told that the fighting moves had really long names, but I find longer names more exciting. They feel more novel, for one thing... As for how I chose them, I just looked in the dictionary and put together words that looked cool.
The idea for The Gorgeous Irene came to me suddenly during my pursuit of a more physical style. I used the name Irene simply because I thought it sounded adorable. There's not any particular meaning behind it.
The Gorgeous Irene was an experimental work; I wanted to try out drawing girls too. What I learned was that I can't. I don't know if it's because I don't understand how they feel, or what... I came out of it figuring that men draw men. That's one reason why JoJo doesn't have many female characters.
But lately, the times are changing, and girls are becoming more proactive, so I think that I might be able to draw them now.
And then finally came the beginning of JoJo. I had gotten a little bit of money from Baoh, enough to go on my very first overseas vacation to England for ten days. But I didn't know what kind of food to order aside from rice, and I really had trouble. Especially when I can't speak English...
But my experiences on that trip led to JoJo's Part 1. Incidentally, because I went under the pretext of doing research for my work, two years later I tried to write it off from my taxes as a business expense. The tax office told me that a vacation I went on two years prior couldn't count as a business expense, and they charged me the extra amount. I was sooo bitter! [laughs] But maybe I'll get in trouble for saying that here. [laughs]
The "ゴゴゴゴゴゴ" [gogogogogogo] sound effects are rhythm and mood—the tempo I feel as I'm drawing. Maybe I'll add a ドーン [doon] here and an eerie ゴゴゴゴ there. And isn't Dio's 無駄無駄無駄 [muda muda muda] great for really feeling like he's shouting? Sound effects can be similar to music in that regard.

As for my favorite JoJo character, I'd have to go with Josuke, I think. And Jotaro, and Dio. And then D'Arby and N'Doul—I like characters with their own aesthetics. My least favorite is Vanilla Ice. I decided to draw him as an unlikable person. And wouldn't you know it, as I was drawing him, I came to not like him.
I don't find either good or evil characters easier to draw than the other. Maybe they're two sides of the same coin... Good characters come with a lot of different restrictions, but while I'm drawing them, there's also part of them that makes me think, "This person kind of looks like they have a freaky side," and that's fun.
Both good and evil are easy to draw, and both are hard to draw, too... but if I had to pick I'd say that bad characters are more interesting. They have a kind of freedom; they can just destroy things if they want.
Jotaro's school uniform is from Babel II, which also has a protagonist who wears a school uniform and goes to the desert. I just think that's extremely cool—to go on an adventure dressed like that. There's a certain kind of romanticism there, and beauty. Even though in ordinary manga, I'm sure they'd take their uniforms off.

Nikola Tesla, which I wrote and supervised, came about because I was reading about the man and thought he was really incredible. A lot of books have come out about him now, but there were almost none at the time we did the project. I was stunned when I read about him. He was super eccentric, but also a genius, and I was immediately drawn to him as a character.
Now—and this isn't about Nikola Tesla—I'm drawn to the dark sides of people. I want to know what made them that way. I'm strongly taken in by people who commit crimes, while probably feeling casually about it, that end up being a huge incident.

Right now, JoJo is everything!

I'm also interested in fashion, and I read fashion books and catalogs from places like France and Italy to get ideas for my character's clothing and accessories. Flamboyant designers like Versace and Moschino make for great drawings. But there's one downside—when I keep drawing the same fashions for an extended time, I get tired of them. [laughs] It's the same as with real fashion—you don't keep wearing the same trends for two or three years straight.
Early on, I also referred to Japanese fashion magazines, but they're not the same. We're behind. A trend will start elsewhere, and then about a year later, everyone here imitates it and then it's the trend here.

My process of drawing manga begins with the rough draft. I write the script on notebook paper, and if I go over length, I'll make cuts or shift some to the next week's chapter. I usually finish the script within twelve hours. I have a meeting with my editor to go over the rough draft, and after that I do the panel layout and go on to drawing.
I work on one page at a time, from penciling to inking. I don't do the entire chapter's penciling at one go, because my five assistants work more efficiently if we take each page from start to finish. The panel layout almost never changes from the rough draft to the final pages, although sometimes I'll reword the dialogue.
I do the rough draft and the panel layout on Sunday. Then Monday, we work from eleven until usually midnight. We do take a proper break for about an hour-and-a-half starting at three. Tuesday and Wednesday are the same, and we'll finish the pages by around six on Thursday. Then, until midnight, I'll work out my ideas for the next week. Then I have Friday and Saturday to work on color illustrations, or research, or resting. I'm not very good at doing research. [laughs] Talking to people I don't know, that's a little... [laughs] Going to the zoo, even asking questions of the zookeepers, makes me so nervous.
When I'm working, I keep a rather strict pace, because if I take my time I'll never be done.
In the afternoon, I have to give my assistants lots of instructions, and as a consequence, my own work often comes to a stop. My most productive time of day is after they go home at eight.
Sometimes I'm better at coming up with ideas than other times. When I'm in that creative mode, I don't waste it, and I get out every idea I can. That makes things easier for me.
I've never had a prolonged slump, but there are times where I just don't want to do anything. But of course I can't not do my work. I suppose that happens to everyone right? Or maybe not.
I've always worked as hard as I could, so if you asked me what parts are difficult, I'd say all of it. [laughs]

Sometimes I'm asked if I'll ever continue Baoh or B.T., but to me, those stories have ended. I get letters, too, asking me to "bring out Polnareff" or "bring Kakyoin back to life." But Part 4 already has characters of the same type as them, so there wouldn't be much of a point to it. Joseph and Jotaro are only in Part 4 because they belong to the Joestar bloodline.
I don't have any kind of lingering attachment to or regret about my past work. You could say that's because I'm decisive, but it might be more that I'm forgetful. [laughs]
I think of my work as something close to a diary. Rather than set it aside or let it steep, I try as best I can to draw my art in a single take and move on, rather than to keep on amending it, or to set it aside and come back later, because I want to value my emotions in that moment.

I'm going to give JoJo Part 4 everything I've got!

INTERVIEW
HIROHIKO
ARAKI
荒木飛呂彦インタビュー

『ジョジョ』をはじめ数々の異色作を生み出した荒木飛呂彦先生。その知られざる一面や少年時代、デビュー当時のエピソードや『ジョジョ』誕生秘話なども交えて、作家・荒木飛呂彦の本質に迫る。なぜ『ジョジョ』は生まれたのか?スタンドの発想の原点は?第4部のテーマは?そんな、すべての謎が氷解する初のロング・インタビューだ。


精神の(ビジョン)、スタンド!! その発想の原点とは!?

『ジョジョ』で各部ごとに主人公が変わる、というのは連載当初から決めていたんですよ。全3部構成ぐらいにして、そのたびにキャラクターと、戦いや技を新しくして。それで主人公はすべて「ジョジョ」とよばれることにしよう、と。
 もちろん「波紋」とか「スタンド」とかのアイデアは、まだなかったですよ。ただ、ひとつの血筋の物語で、過去から現代に向かっていく奇妙な話にしようと思っていました。
 第1部で、人気があるのに主人公を変える、というのは当時の担当編集者も最初は反対したんです。でも「タイトルも“奇妙な冒険”だし、作者も創作上の冒険をしなくては」と賛成してくれたんです。本当に、あれは冒険だったな。

「スタンド」とか「波紋」の発想の原点にあるのは、いわゆる「超能力」というものに対する疑問からなんです。その存在自体は半信半疑なんだけど「念じるだけで物が動く」ってのが、なんか卑怯な感じがするんですよ。UFOでも幽霊でもそうだけど「見た」って言うだけじゃなくて、嘘でもいいから証拠を見せてくれ、と…。裏づけというか説得力というか、そういうものが欲しかったんです。「ムッ」と念じるだけで物がバーンと割れるんじゃなくて、他人には見えないんだけど実際に何かが出てきて、そいつが物を割ってくれる、みたいな。だからスタンドは、超能力を説明するための手段、エセ説得力なんですよ(笑)。
 スタンドの名前の由来は、枕元に幽霊みたいにドーンと立つ、という意味からです。スタンドは応用が効くんですよ、とにかく色々なタイプのスタンドが出てくるんです。「何でもできるぞ、これは便利なアイデアだ」と自分自身で思いました(笑)。
 ただスタンドの定義は考えてあります。例えば、ひとつの能力に違う能力は入ってこれない。つまり一体のスタンドには、限定された一種類の超能力しかないんですよ。だから何種類かに分類することもできるんです。
 第3部でタロットカードと結びつけたのは、スタンドの個性を作っていきたかったから。タロット22枚分もスタンドが描けると思ったんですが、足りませんでしたね(笑)。第3部開始時でスタンドのアイデアは漠然とだけど15体、今でもストックだけで80体くらいはあります。
 スタンドのデザインは、ロボットとかヨロイとは違った感じにしてます。妖怪の本とかブキミな感じの民芸品なんかも参考にします。デザインは、まず能力を決めて、そこから大きくはずれないものにします。でも、自分ではスタンドのデザインや形より、どちらかというと、キャラの駆け引きとかの心理戦に気持ちは行ってますね。例えば力の強い敵ばかりと闘うんじゃなくてパワーがなくてウソをつくだけの敵でも、一点だけを攻めてこられるとこんなに怖いぞ、というような。
 第4部を1999年という未来に設定したのは、第3部の続きだし、なんか世紀末の不安みたいなものがあって、しかも日常も描けていいな、と。とんでもない未来にすると現実と離れてしまうんですよ。あとは例えば第3部のように開始が’89年で終了が’92年だと「第3部はいつの話なのか」という疑問も出てきます。それに、ウソの犯罪や事件なども作れるような「何でもあり」の世界にしたかったんですよ。初めは死後の世界の話にしようかな、とも思ったんだけど、それだと馴染みがないし。
 第4部のテーマのひとつは「街を描く、街を創る」ということなんです。第3部の時、例えばタバコ屋のオバチャンがスタンド使いだったら、といった日常的なアイデアも出たんですよ。敵が襲ってきた第3部と違って、今度は敵がジッと待っていることもできるわけです。また杜王町もまだ未完成だから、これから病院だってできるかもしれないし、町長も出てくるかもしれない。ゴミ問題だって浮上するかもしれない。とにかくいろいろあると思いますよ。

『ジョジョ』のキャラの名前は外国のミュージシャンから取っています。これは自分が名前をつけやすくて覚えやすいから。ただそれだけ(笑)。新たに名前をつけると混乱するし思いつかないんですよ。「花京院」も仙台にある町の名前からだし。第4部になってからは、日本人の名前を考えているんだけど、これがなかなか大変。仗助は仗(ジョ)助(ジョ)って決めていたんですが名字は何にしようかなって考えて。第3部の空条承太郎は「条」「承」と続けることだけ決めていて、あとは漢和辞典を見ながら「あ、空か、いいな」って。「虹村」も漢和辞典を取り出して「虹がいいなあ、虹木や虹岡よりは虹村だな」とか。言いやすさも考えながら、好きな漢字をつなげているんですよ。
 でも、もう「ジョジョ」と続く名前のネタがないんです。だから第5部をやるとしたら主役の名前に困るだろうな(笑)。

マンガと映画に明け暮れた僕の少年時代

 僕が最初に絵を描きはじめたのは…、白土三平先生の『ワタリ』とか、ちばてつや先生の『ハリスの旋風』とかの模写だったと思います。幼稚園か小学校1年生の頃かな…。すっげ一昔ですね、『ウルトラマン』とかテレビでやっていた頃だから。模写のほかにも、なんかストーリーも作っていたような気がする。用心棒が悪者と戦うような…。時代劇マンガとかも好きだったんですよ。ほかに『タイガーマスク』や『柔道一直線』、『荒野の少年イサム』、楳図かずお先生の恐怖シリーズ…、好きなマンガはたくさんありましたね。『少年ジャンプ』の創刊号も読みましたよ。
 その中でも特に影響を受けたマンガ家が、横山光輝先生です。『鉄人28号』とか『バビル2世』とか、大好きでした。あとはマンガの原作を書いていた梶原一騎先生。一冊単行本を買ったらボロボロになるくらい、毎晩読んでいましたねえ…。
 少年時代は普通でしたよ。ただ、みんながワーッと盛り上がっていても、ちょっと冷静な感じで見ていたり、とか。そんな子供でしたね。だから趣味はマンガか映画。プラモデルとかラジコンにはまったく興味なかったです。映画はマカロニウェスタンが大好きでした。クリント・イーストウッドの映画がよかった!!
 僕の父親も好きなんですよ、イーストウッドは。
 前に「僕の父母は僕のマンガを理解できない」とコミックスのカバー裏に書いたけれど、やっぱりいまだに理解できないみたいなんですよ。でも僕はイーストウッドに憧れてマンガを描いているから、絶対わかるハズなんだよな、ハートは同じなんだから。アニメ版『ジョジョ』を見てもらえば面白いと思ってくれるんじゃないかな、と思っています。
 映画は、あとは『ゴジラ』シリーズも見ていたし、『ポセイドン・アドベンチャー』みたいなパニック物も好きでした。小遣いに比べて映画の料金が高かったから、そんなに回数は観に行けなかったんですけどね。

 スポーツは剣道をやっていました。団体スポーツってダメだったんだよなぁ。少年野球団に入ったこともあったんだけど、エラーするとね、視線が来るんです。そういうのがイヤだったんですよね。ひとりで走るのはいいけどリレーはイヤだ、みたいな。剣道だったら負けても自分の責任だからいいんだけど。団体行動ができなかったヤツでした(笑)。
 手品とか奇術も好きでした。手品の本で練習したりとか。トランプ遊びが好きだったんですね。
 あとは、やっぱ海外のロックが好きでしたね。’60年代後半からの、シカゴとかイエスとかレッド・ツェッペリンとか、そのへんを聞くようになりました。ジャクソン・ブラウン、ボブ・ディランなんかも好きでしたね。’80年代では、この本の表紙イラストを描く時も聴いていたプリンス。この人には今でも熱狂しています。
 海外のプログレを聞くと、古代とか中世のバロックとか、そんな雰囲気があって想像力がかきたてられるんですよ。
 ただ子供の頃は、レコードが高くて買えなかったからラジオをエアチェックしてました。ラジカセも持ってなくてね、英語の勉強だとか言って買ってもらった学習教材の、でっかいオープンリールのカセットデッキのマイクをこう、ラジオに近づけて。音楽やっている間、じ〜っと静かにして録音してました。そういう時代だったんですねぇ(笑)。
 でも、日本の音楽はほとんど聞かなかったな。

 高校の頃になると、学校とかに行ってても映画館に行きたくなったりとか「今日はジャンプの発売日だ」って気になっちゃって、しょうがないんですよ。だから昼休みに本屋に買いに行ったりとかしてました(笑)。

 じつは僕、小さな頃からずっとマンガ家になりたいと思っていたんですよね。でも、それは隠していたんですよ。「将来の夢は?」と聞かれて「マンガ家」と答えると「頑張ってね」ってみんな言うけど「なれるわけねえだろ」という無言の態度を、僕は子供ながらビビビビッと感じていたんです。だから親にも言いませんでしたね、マンガ家になりたいって。同人誌みたいなものもやったことがないし。
 そのうちにマンガ家になりたい、ではなく「マンガを描きたい。絵やデザインや、物語の世界にひたっていたい!!」という気持ちになっていたんですよ。それでデザインの専門学校に通いながら、西部劇マンガを2本くらいかな、あとはSFマンガとか、合計で4本ぐらい描いたんです。
 それを『少年ジャンプ』の手塚賞とかに応募してたんですよ。『少年マガジン』とかも好きだったんだけど、’80年代に入るとラブコメ路線になっていて、それがすっげー気に入らなかったんでジャンプにしたんです。
 ところが、応募したジャンプの編集部からは何も言ってこないんですよ。それで「なぜなんだ、一度、東京まで行ってみようかなあ」と。
 そんな感じで持ち込みをしたんですが、その時に見てくれた編集者が袋から原稿を取り出した途端、「トビラにホワイトの忘れがある、こんなのは小学生でも消せるぞ」と。中身も見ずにいきなり言うんですよ、だからビックリしちゃって(笑)。でも、それで「一生懸命やらなくちゃいけないんだ」って思いましたね。それで気合いを入れてストーリーを練り直して、新しく描き直したんですよ。30ページぐらいの作品に4か月ぐらいかかったかな…。学校から帰ってから毎日、コツコツと描いてました。それを編集者に見てもらって、ちょっと手直ししたのが手塚賞に準入選した『武装ポーカー』なんですよ。

デビューから現在までの作品の系譜!!

『武装ポーカー』を運よくジャンプ本誌に載せてもらって。それからデザイン学校を卒業して、ずっと仙台の自宅でマンガを描いていたんですよ。その頃の作品が『アウトロー・マン』という西部劇や、SFの『バージニアによろしく』ですね。
 それで最初の連載作『魔少年ビーティー』に至るわけです。これもね、まだ仙台の実家で描いていたんですよ。ちょうど宅急便のシステムができはじめた頃で、ネームのコピーを宅急便で送って、編集者との打ち合わせは電話で済ますという。コレ、岸辺露伴みたいな生活ですね(笑)。
 でも当時の担当編集者が鬼のような人で(笑)。完成原稿を送ると「直しがあるから明日、東京に来い」って電話があって。「自分で持っていった方がよかったな」と思いつつ、集英社の会議室で徹夜で修正。灰皿を筆洗いやホワイト皿の代わりに使ったりしてました(笑)。だから翌日の電車の中で寝ていましたね。
 しかし、あの時の厳しい試練は、自分の初めて出会った「社会」との対面だったわけで、実に多くのことを彼から学んだと思います。担当編集者には、「マンガ家」として誰よりも影響を受けたなあ。編集者というのは鬼であり神様のような人だと思います。DIOがエジプトにいるって決めたのも彼なんですよ。
 そのあとが『バオー来訪者』ですね。『ビーティー』をやっている頃から構想はあったんですよ。そのコンセプトを担当の編集者に話したら「それを連載しよう、東京に来い」と言われて、’84年の夏に上京したんです。「来訪者」ってのは別に意味はないんですよ。戻ってきて襲ってくるとか、そんなニュアンスですね。当時は、ちょうどバイオ・テクノロジーが話題になっていて「これマンガに使えるんじゃん」って。だからバオーの語源はバイオなんです。同時に『ランボー』みたいな筋肉野郎モノが流行っていて「肉体を追求せねばならん!」とか思っていたんです。
 技の名前が長い、とよく言われるんですが、僕は長い方が気合いが入るんですよ。その方が新鮮だし…。名前は、適当に辞書をながめてカッコいい文字を並べて。そんな感じでしたね。
『ゴージャス☆アイリン』も肉体を追求しているうちに閃いたアイデアなんですよ。アイリンという名前に関しては、可愛らしいものをと思っただけで、特に意味はないです。
 これは、女の子も描いてみよう、という実験作でもあったんですよ。その結果、判明したのが「俺には女の子は描けん」ということ。女の子の気持ちがよく分からんというか…。やっぱり男は男を描くんだなぁ、ということでしたね。『ジョジョ』に女性があまり出ないのには、そういう理由もあるんですよ。
 ただ最近は、時代的に女の子が行動的になったりもしているから、今なら描けそうな気がしています。
 それで、いよいよ『ジョジョ』が始まるわけです。前の『バオー』で、ちょっとだけお金が入ったんで、生まれて初めて海外旅行に行ったんですよ、イギリスに10日ぐらい。でもお米のご飯食べたいとかいう以前に、何を注文していいのかがわからなくて、すっげー不自由してました。英語も話せないし…。
 でも、その海外旅行の体験があったから『ジョジョ』第1部を描いたんですよ。ちなみに取材旅行という名目で、旅行の2年後に経費で落とそうとしたら「2年前の旅行は経費にならない」と税務署に追徴金を取られました。それ、すっげー恨みましたよ(笑)。あ、こんなこと言うとマズイかなぁ(笑)。
 作品中にある「ゴゴゴゴゴコ」っていう効果音はノリですね、ノリ。描いているテンポ。「ここでドーンを入れよう」とか「ここはブキミなゴゴゴゴだ」とか。DIOの「無駄無駄無駄」も「叫ぶ!」という感じでいいじゃないですか。その辺は音楽に似ているかもしれないですね。

『ジョジョ』で好きなキャラっていうと、やっぱり仗助かな。それに承太郎とかDIO。あとはダービーとかンドゥールとか、それなりの美学をもっているキャラが好きです。嫌いなのは、イヤなヤツを描こうと思って描いたヴァニラ・アイス。なんか、描いててイヤになってしまいました。
 善と悪では、どちらが描きやすいとかいうことはないですね。表裏一体というか…。善は、いろいろと規制があるんですが、善を描いても「なんかコイツ変態ぽいよな」みたいな部分もあるから、それも楽しいし。
 描きやすいといったらどっちも描きやすいし、描きにくいといえばどっちも描きにくいし…。
でも、どっちかっていうとやっぱり悪が面白いんじゃないかな。何かをブッ壊したりとか、何かと自由にできますからね。

 承太郎の学ランは、じつは『バビル2世』が原点なんですよ。『バビル2世』も主人公が学ランを着て砂漠に行くじゃないですか。あれがね、僕は「異常にカッコいい!!」と思うんですよ。あの格好で冒険するってスゲーですよ。ロマンというか、ある種の美しさがありますよね。普通は学ランなんか脱がせるものなんだろうけど…。

 原作と構成をやった『NIKOLA TESLA』は、この人の話を読んだ時にスゲエやつだなぁって思ったんです。この人の関係の本が何冊か出ているんですけど、当時はほとんどなくて。とにかくショックを受けたんですよ。超変人でありながら天才ですからね、そういうキャラクターに引かれたんです。
 ニコラ・テスラのことではないんですが、人間の暗部とか、そういう部分にも惹かれますね。「なんで、そういうふうになるのかな」っていう。多分、本人たちは何気ない気持ちで犯罪を犯しているのだろうけれども、それがおおごとになってしまっているという。そこになぜかグッと惹かれるんですよね。

今は『ジョジョ』がすべてです!!

 ファッション関係にも興味があるからキャラの服装とか小物もフランスやイタリアのファッション関係の洋書、カタログなんかを参考にしています。ヴェルサーチとかモスキーノなんかはギンギンに派手だから絵になるんですよ。ただ、それも欠点があって、長く描くと飽きてくるんですよ(笑)。流行の服を2年も3年も着ないのと同じなんですよねぇ。
 日本のファッション誌も初めの頃は見ていたんですけど、なんかちょっと違うんですよ。遅いんですよね、外国で流行ったものが1年くらいたってから、みんな真似して流行る、みたいな。

 原稿は、まず初めにネームから入ります。ネームはレポート用紙に、原作みたいな形で手書きで文章を書いて、こぼれた分はカットしたり翌週に回したり。だいたい12時間以内にネームは終わります。それで編集者とネームの打ち合わせをして、コマを割って、それから原稿の絵に入っていくんですよ。
 原稿は1ページずつ、下書きをしてペン入れをして、という形です。イッキに下書きをしないのは、1ページずつ5人のアシスタントに効率よく仕事をしてもらうためなんです。ネームと実際の原稿のコマ割りが変わることは、ほとんどないですね。セリフの言い回しを変えたりはするんですが…。
 ネームからコマ割りまでを描くのが日曜日。月曜日は11時から始まって夜はだいたい12時ぐらいまでですね。ちゃんと昼休みも3時から1時間半ほど取ります。火曜日、水曜日も同じで、木曜日の6時ぐらいまでに原稿を仕上げます。それで12時ぐらいまでは翌週のアイデアを練る、と。それで金曜日と土曜日でカラーイラストや取材をしたり休んだり。取材はあんまりうまくないです(笑)。知らない人とお話するのがチョット…(笑)。動物園の飼育係の人に話を聞こうとしても、すっげードキドキするんですよ!!
 仕事の進め方は、かなりキッチリしているけど、ダラダラしていると終わらないからなんですよ。
 昼間はアシスタントにいろいろ指示をしたりするから自分の作業が止まることが多い。だから一日のうちで、いちばん仕事がはかどるのは、やっぱりアシスタントが帰った夜8時以降ですね。
 アイデア出しなどでも、好調な時と不調な時があります。だから好調な時に怠けずに、アイデアをいっぱい出しておくんですよ。そうすると楽ですね。
 長いスランプっていうのはないんですが、何もしたくない時というのがやっぱり来るんですよ。でも休むわけにもいかないし…。そういうのって、誰にでもあるんじゃないですか? そうでもないのかな。
 これまで、一生懸命やってきたから、苦しいといえばいつも苦しいんですけど(笑)。

『バオー』や『ビーティー』の続編は描かないのか、と時々言われるんです。でも自分の中で終わった話ですからね…。「ポルナレフを出して」とか「花京院を蘇らせて」という手紙も来ます。でも同じタイプのキャラはすでに第4部で出ているから、かつてのキャラを出しても意味がないっていうか…。第4部でジョセフや承太郎が出るのはジョースターの血のつながりゆえなんですよ。
 昔の作品には全然未練はないです。思い切りがいいというより忘れっぽいのかも(笑)。
 作品は日記に近い物と考えているんですよ。作品をねかしたり、あたためたりせずに、なるべくワンテイクで描いて、その時に感じていることを大切にしたいと思っています。

 とにかく今は『ジョジョ』第4部に全力投球ですね!!


Gallery

Errors

In the glossary of terms, there's an error in the entry for "Danse Macabre Hair" that states it appeared in Part 2, instead of Part 1. It also states that Joseph was the one who fought Bruford, as opposed to Jonathan. However, both these errors were fixed in VIZ Media's English localization. In the sound effects section, it also similarly states that Jonathan ate pasta rather than Joseph. This was corrected to Joseph in the English version. Additionally, Wired Beck, Vanilla Ice, and Nukesaku are all incorrectly classified as zombies rather than vampires. In the "Araki World's Goods Collection" section, the covers for America and Spain's Baoh the Visitor volumes are swapped. It's worth noting that neither of these errors were fixed in the English localization.

In his character profile, Jotaro Kujo is stated to have awakened Star Platinum when he was 16 years old, despite it also stating in the timeline that he was born in 1970 and his Stand manifests in late 1987. In the English localization, High Priestess's user is stated to be "Midler" in the Character Profile section. However, the "Dictionary of Characters in JoJo" section lists her name as "Rose" instead, which is only her localized name for the Crunchyroll subtitles.

Trivia

References

Site Navigation

Other languages: